State Propositions

There are 11 state propositions on the November ballot.

Information is from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, providing nonpartisan fiscal and policy analysis for the CA Legislature.

Proposition 1
Veterans and Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018.

A YES vote on this measure means: Allows the state to sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans and affordable housing.

A NO vote on this measure means: The state could not sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans and affordable housing.

 

Proposition 2
No Place Like Home Act of 2018.

A YES vote on this measure means: The state could use existing county mental health funds to pay for housing for those with mental illness who are homeless.

A NO vote on this measure means: The state’s ability to use existing county mental health funds to pay for housing for those with mental illness who are homeless would depend on future court decisions.

 

Proposition 3
Authorizes Bonds to Fund Projects for Water Supply and Quality, Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Water Conveyance, and Groundwater Sustainability and Storage.

A YES vote on this measure means: The state could sell $8.9 billion in general obligation bonds to fund various water and environmental projects.

A NO vote on this measure means: The state could not sell $8.9 billion in general obligation bonds to fund various water and environmental projects.

 

Proposition 4
Authorizes Bonds Funding Construction at Hospitals Providing Children’s Health Care. 

A YES vote on this measure means: The state could sell $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds for the construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of certain hospitals that treat children.

A NO vote on this measure means: The state could not sell the $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds proposed for these purposes.

 

Proposition 5
Changes Requirements for Certain Property Owners to Transfer Their Property Tax Base to Replacement Property.

A YES vote on this measure means: All homeowners who are over 55 (or who meet other qualifications) would be eligible for property tax savings when they move to a different home.

A NO vote on this measure means: Certain homeowners who are over 55 (or who meet other qualifications) would continue to be eligible for property tax savings when they move to a different home.

 

Proposition 6
Eliminates Recently Enacted Road Repair and Transportation Funding by Repealing Revenues Dedicated for Those Purposes. 

A YES vote on this measure means: Fuel and vehicle taxes recently passed by the Legislature would be eliminated, which would reduce funding for highway and road maintenance and repairs, as well as transit programs. The Legislature would be required to get a majority of voters to approve new or increased state fuel and vehicle taxes in the future.

A NO vote on this measure means: Fuel and vehicle taxes recently passed by the Legislature would continue to be in effect and pay for highway and road maintenance and repairs, as well as transit programs. The Legislature would continue not to need voter approval for new or increased state fuel and vehicle taxes in the future.

 

Proposition 7
Daylight saving time.

A YES vote on this measure means: The Legislature, with a two-thirds vote, could change daylight saving time if the change is allowed by the federal government. Absent any legislative change, California would maintain its current daylight saving time period (early March to early November).

A NO vote on this measure means: California would maintain its current daylight saving time period.

 

Proposition 8
Authorizes State Regulation of Kidney Dialysis Clinics. Limits Charges for Patient Care. 

A YES vote on this measure means: Kidney dialysis clinics would have their revenues limited by a formula and could be required to pay rebates to certain parties (primarily health insurance companies) that pay for dialysis treatment.

A NO vote on this measure means: Kidney dialysis clinics would not have their revenues limited by a formula and would not be required to pay rebates.

 

Proposition 10
Expands Local Governments’ Authority to Enact Rent Control on Residential Property.

A YES vote on this measure means: State law would not limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.

A NO vote on this measure means: State law would continue to limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.

 

Proposition 11
Requires Private-Sector Emergency Ambulance Employees to Remain on Call During Work Breaks.

A YES vote on this measure means: Private ambulance companies could continue their current practice of having emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics stay on-duty during their meal and rest breaks in order to respond to 911 calls. Private ambulance companies would attempt to reschedule meal and rest breaks that are interrupted by a 911 call.

A NO vote on this measure means: Private ambulance companies would be subject to labor laws for this industry. Based on a recent court decision, these laws likely would require ambulance companies to provide EMTs and paramedics with off-duty meal and rest breaks that cannot be interrupted by a 911 call.

 

Proposition 12
Establishes New Standards for Confinement of Certain Farm Animals; Bans Sale of Certain Non-Complying Products.

A YES vote on this measure means: There would be new minimum requirements on farmers to provide more space for egg-laying hens, breeding pigs, and calves raised for veal. California businesses would be banned from selling eggs or uncooked pork or veal that came from animals housed in ways that did not meet these requirements.

A NO vote on this measure means: Current minimum space requirements for confining egg-laying hens, pregnant pigs, and calves raised for veal would continue to apply. Current ban on businesses in California selling eggs not meeting these space requirements for hens would remain in effect.